Thank You

We want to thank our community for making IowaFlood.com such a success. If it wasn’t for you this website would have gone nowhere. Thank you for submitting content and telling people about our little site here. We hope that this website serves as a historical archive for the Iowa Flood of 2008. And if a similar disaster happens to the good people of Iowa we will be here to help.

Thanks,

Andy Brudtkuhl
48Web

Wednesday Flood Update

AREAS OF CONCERN

State
officials continue to closely monitor the Mississippi River in southeast Iowa while aggressively
coordinating recovery efforts in other parts of the state.


Keokuk

The
river is projected to crest in Keokuk on Thursday afternoon at 27.4 feet, just
under the record of 27.6 feet.

Iowa
National Guard troops and other state resources remain in the area and are
ready to help local officials respond to any emergency.

Local
officials along the Mississippi in southeast Iowa have used the days
before the river surge to effectively raise levees to protect key
infrastructure items like water treatment plants. “All state resources
will be used to continue this flood fight,” Governor Chet Culver
stressed.

The
Governor visited Fort
Madison and
Keokuk Wednesday afternoon to ensure local officials and first responders
have the state resources they need.

Cedar Rapids
Cedar Rapids Police have requested
assistance via the Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC) for
additional law enforcement support. Additional officers are requested to
provide public safety and law enforcement services in flood zones in the
city. Officers from Minnesota and Nebraska will supplement Iowa law enforcement resources to provide
this support and are being implemented as phased in
deployments on a timeline established by Cedar Rapids Police.

Officials understand the frustration of Cedar Rapids residents who
want to return home. They stress they are working to clear the evacuated area
of all hazards to ensure a safe reentry. Sink holes, downed power lines and
uncovered manholes remain a hazard. While the city’s water capacity has
improved, residents are asked to conserve water. Linn County
has established regular press briefings and residents are encouraged to tune to
those for the latest information. Large portions of the city have been opened
for reentry.

Four Disaster Recovery Centers were established in Cedar Rapids Wednesday.
These centers give those impacted by the floods a place to meet face to face
with state and federal workers to learn about specific programs available to
help them and the steps needed to enroll in those programs.

Fort Madison
The Fort Madison Toll Bridge has reopened.

Local officials have taken steps to protect the local water treatment facility.

More than 200 National Guard soldiers are in the area to help local officials
with flood preparation and response.

Ottumwa
The
river has crested in Ottumwa.
Though waters are receding, the threat remains that water control efforts could
fail. Citizens are encouraged to use caution in the coming days.

Tuesday Morning Iowa Flood Update

Sandbagging and levee building efforts continue in southeastern Iowa. National guard troops are working in Des Moines and Lee counties to build up levees to protect key infrastructure. There was a levee breach at Gulfport, Illinois, across from Burlington. Officials are reviewing the situation. Early reports indicate the levee breach will force a new road closure. (See Road headings for more information.)

Columbus Junction/Fredonia

The river has crested in Columbus Junction. Officials continue to monitor the Des Moines River.

Ottuwma

Army Corps of Engineers will slow the Red Rock release rate from 115,000 CFS to 100,000 CFS. This change means that the water will stay at the 21.3 for 12 – 14 days.

Ottumwa will continue to build up the berm around the water treatment facility. Sandbagging efforts are going smoothly.

Cedar Rapids

Officials understand the frustration of Cedar Rapids residents who want to return home. They stress they are working to clear the evacuated area of all hazards to ensure a safe reentry. Sink holes, downed power lines and uncovered manholes remain a hazard. While the city’s water capacity has improved, residents are asked to conserve water. Linn county has established regular press briefings and residents are encouraged to tune to those for the latest information.

via Governor Culver’s Website